Face to Face with LegCo’s Newly Elected Lawyer-Members

In this question-and-answer series, LegCo’s five newly-elected lawyer-members discuss what prompted them to pursue a career in law, what motivated them to move into politics, and what they hope to accomplish during their first term.

Eunice Yung (New Territories East)

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in law?

First of all, law is very much relevant to every aspect of our lives. For example, even if we stay at home, our matrimonial matters still relate to law. The public, in general, needs professionals who understand the law to help them through a variety of issues and difficulties that they encounter in their lives. I believe that being a lawyer gives me the necessary knowledge and skills to reach out to and help those in need; especially those people at different socioeconomic levels and stages of their lives, such as children, youth and minorities.

Also, I like reading law because it intellectually challenges me. I personally enjoy discussing legal issues with different people.

Law is multifaceted and so is a legal career. In short, my legal career has aligned my passion with my interests.

2. Can you tell me about your experience as a practitioner?

I have been practising law as a barrister since 2008. My work has mostly focused on matrimonial and civil matters. I’m also a general mediator and a family mediator. As a barrister, I usually spend a large amount of time conducting legal research and following legal developments, which I like.

I also act as a pro bono legal adviser for different people and corporations, by which I am able to give back to the community.

3. What prompted you to move into politics?

There are different voices in our community nowadays. Also, different political views and stances are tearing our community apart. In this turbulent time, our fellow Hong Kong citizens often regard politicians as only delivering empty or futile promises. In connection with this, I want to improve our social environment and change how politicians are perceived. This is one reason that inspired me to move into politics.

I treasure having a political platform that will allow me to publicly address our most pressing social issues and to help craft laws and policies that resolve public welfare issues. There are also some public policies that I hope to improve.

Most importantly, I want to make peoples’ voices matter.

4. How will you use your legal training/experience as a member of LegCo?

My legal background will help me to perform my duties as a member of LegCo, as LegCo deals with many different legal matters day in and day out. For instance, my legal background will definitely help me deal with LegCo’s rules and procedures.

I also plan to use my previous work experience in the IT field to encourage more young people to pursue their dreams of establishing their own businesses and support policies that promote the development of science and technologies in both the legal and IT fields.

5. What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

I want to be a role model for our youth: to show them how we, as local students, can get into the international field, gain different experiences and then come back to build a better Hong Kong.

In addition, I would like to encourage more young entrepreneurs to build their businesses, as well as encourage youth to contemplate their career development and life planning with a critical mind.

6. Do you plan to devote all of your time to LegCo work or do you intend to maintain your practice at the same time?  If you plan to maintain your practice, how do you plan to strike a balance between practice and LegCo work?

I will maintain my practice, but I will devote adequate time to my LegCo work, because I have committed to do so.

My role in LegCo and my work as a legal practitioner function as a bridge that connects our community – both my work in LegCo and in legal practice have a public interest element. This is why I will maintain my practice.

Moreover, if I stop practising now, I feel I would lose one of my repertoires to help those in need.

As for how I will strike a balance between my practice and LegCo work, I shall devote a significant amount of my time to my LegCo work at the beginning of my term. As you know, I am a newly sworn-in LegCo member, so I will need time to familiarise myself with the new procedures and adjust the time table. This will be something I will learn and achieve as my term progresses.

7. What one piece of advice would you give to someone thinking of pursuing a career in law?

I would advise any inspired lawyer-to-be to think outside the box and to paint their career planning more broadly. This is because there are so many routes of legal training they can pursue. For example, they can pursue an LL.B. or a JD program or even go abroad to study law. Once they have finished their legal studies, no matter domestically or internationally, they can take the Hong Kong Bar exam (PCLL) and then pursue their legal career in Hong Kong by taking up a traineeship contract or becoming a pupil.

There are so many opportunities and choices for new ambitious lawyers. I wish more youth would get involved with the legal profession.

8. What is your motto in life?

My motto is to first believe, and then achieve. We need to safeguard our dreams and then envisage what we can do with our resources. Then we must employ all our efforts and energies to achieve our dreams regardless of the obstacles and difficulties ahead of us.


Holden Chow (District Council (Second) Functional Constituency)

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in law?

It used to be my dream when I was a kid. As I recall in those days, I loved taking part in school debate and imagined that someday I would stand in the court representing people. When I was in London reading my first degree at the London School of Economics and Political Science, I began to realise that a lot of reputable politicians across the world are also lawyers; the reason being that their legal expertise is very much conducive to their work as lawmakers. As my eagerness to take part in politics grew, I thought it would be advantageous for me to equip myself with legal knowledge and to pave my way for a future political career. So I finally decided to read law and eventually I was admitted as a solicitor in 2009.

2. Can you tell me about your experience as a practitioner?

One of the very interesting characteristics about legal practice is the wide range of common issues we come across in the course of our practice; for instance, personal injuries, family disputes, bankruptcy, drafting commercial agreements, among other things.  All of the knowledge and experience I acquired while practising will be an invaluable lifelong asset.  

3. What prompted you to move into politics?

I joined politics, in part, due to my patriotic sentiments which stem from my childhood, when I studied Chinese history. While I have never attended a patriotic school, my avid interest in learning Chinese history helped me build my sense of identity and of being Chinese. Studying at Uppingham School in the UK also inspired me a lot. It is a very traditional British boarding school, where I was taught discipline and responsibility to society.  

I enjoyed watching parliament debate in the UK; it was interesting and its members always had a good sense of humour. More importantly, it was fascinating to see members debating policies and in doing so, bring about changes to the society.   

4. How will you use your legal training/experience as a member of LegCo?

In my election platform, I pledged to urge the government to modify the Competition Ordinance, including but not limited to introducing the right of direct private litigation against those that have engaged in anti-competitive conduct, whereby damages may be claimed. I will also push for a sufficient level of legal aid to be provided by the government in this connection, which will save claimants a lot of time by eliminating the need to go through the Competition Commission in the first place. Offering alternatives to claimants to commence legal proceedings should help us clamp down on anti-competitive behaviour.

5. What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

Apart from modifying the Competition Ordinance, there are quite a lot of issues that I am very eager to tackle in this LegCo term, including transport and future town planning of Tung Chung and Lantau Island and enhancing the interests of ethnic minorities, namely facilitating them to integrate into our society.   

6. Do you plan to devote all of your time to LegCo work or do you intend to maintain your practice at the same time?  If you plan to maintain your practice, how do you plan to strike a balance between practice and LegCo work?

I think I shall maintain my legal practice but I shall be very cautious in striking a balance between my practice and Legco work. Namely most of my time and effort will be spent on LegCo work and limited time will be dedicated to my practice. 

7. What one piece of advice would you give to someone thinking of pursuing a career in law?

It is a fascinating and highly rewarding career, but it is all about hard work.

8. What is your motto in life?

You do your best, and God will do the rest!


Junius Ho (New Territories West)

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in law?

My uncle was an influential factor. He was born and raised in the rural area of Tuen Mun. His success in becoming a lawyer in the early 1960s really encouraged many members of my family, as well as the entire village and clan. We all looked up to him as a role model and in a way, idolised him, seeing him as a beacon that lit the path ahead for us. When I reached the age of about 10 in the early 1970s, I realised that becoming a lawyer could be a pathway to success. I also realised that one’s choice of career also mattered a lot to one’s subsequent development. That helped me, even though I was still very young, to set my mind on becoming a lawyer. My mindset motivated me to work hard along the way and throw myself into studying and practicing law.

2. Can you tell me about your experience as a practitioner?

Since my admission in 1988, I have primarily focused on civil litigation; however, I occasionally take on corporate work. While my main strength is in administrative law, I have also handled winding-up cases and other company disputes. In disputes-related work, I usually act for the underdog or for the minority interest or for those who are underprivileged. I take pride in fighting for their rights and speaking out on their behalf to try to help them achieve a fair and appropriate solution or arrangement.

3. What prompted you to move into politics?

There are a lot of similarities between law and politics. Law affects every walk of life; it affects every trade and industry within the society; the same with politics. Seeing this connection, I was motivated to expand my efforts in working on behalf of the underdogs and the underprivileged. That is, to use my legal skills in a different way to effect positive change for these individuals.

4. How will you use your legal training/experience as a member of LegCo?

As LegCo is primarily concerned with making laws, my legal training will help me in vetting bills; likely more so than those who come from different trades or professions. Also, my experience working with underprivileged segments of society should be very useful in my work to help shape future policies. That is, to work to ensure policies are not lopsided in favour of commercial interests only. I have the mindset to take into account those who are in need and may not be in the same bargaining positions as those who come from the commercial world and are armed with heavy resources.

5. What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

There are three issues that I plan to focus on during my term. The first is upholding the rule of law. The core value of upholding the law and justice is essential in Hong Kong, so I will put significant emphasis on this point. The second is to push for more environmental protection policies. The government is currently advocating for measures that will reduce domestic and solid waste. I fully support this proposal, but the measures need to be carefully reviewed to ensure they will be carried out in an effective and efficient manner. My third aim is to focus on policies that will improve the economy. At the moment, there is an overemphasis on the services industry. If we are going to achieve long-term, sustainable economic growth, we need to diversify a little bit more.

6. Do you plan to devote all of your time to LegCo work or do you intend to maintain your practice at the same time? If you plan to maintain your practice, how do you plan to strike a balance between practice and LegCo work?

Yes, but I will try to strike a balance. At the moment, I have this formula – the four-quarters rule. I allocate one quarter of my day, or six hours, for rest, to ensure I have sufficient time for sleep. Then six hours for my family. My remaining twelve hours will be devoted to work – half to my legal practice and half to my LegCo work. In theory, this is how I will structure and spend my time. In reality, some sort of adjustments will need to be made.

7. What one piece of advice would you give to someone thinking of pursuing a career in law?

You have to accept the reality that a legal career is no longer a guaranteed golden rice bowl in Hong Kong. In the good old days, you were guaranteed a very comfortable living standard by choosing a professional career. Today, it is different. You cannot just stick with the old school way of thinking. While you will still have to work hard, you will also need to build up personal relationships in order to make your professional career a success. Neglecting to build relationships is similar to owning a computer without network access. However technologically advanced the computer is, without access to the outside world or networks, like the internet, your ability to succeed is limited.

8. What is your motto in life?

Try to trust people and get people to trust you. If you do not work hard and demonstrate your ability, you will be down and out. If you demonstrate your good work and your good intentions, people will be willing to accept you. But to earn the trust of others, you must be persistent. You have to be a trust-worthy person, but not just for one day. You have to do it as a life-time practice. You have to learn how to trust and show that you are trustworthy.


Horace Cheung (Hong Kong Island) 

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in law?

Law is related to almost every aspect of our lives and legal knowledge is essential to resolving our daily problems. Legal training also equipped me with the ability to deal with matters in a logical and objective way. From the perspective of the common good, the legal practice allows me to help the needy and make contributions to Hong Kong, especially via the safeguard of the rule of law.

2. Can you tell me about your experience as a practitioner?

After completing my legal training at one of the oldest local firm Messrs. Wilkinson & Grist, I was admitted as a solicitor in Hong Kong in 2000, with my practice mainly focusing on civil and commercial litigation. I commenced my own practice in partnership in 2012 and my law firm is located just next to the Legislative Council Complex for the sake of convenience. In addition to the partnership, I am a civil celebrant of marriages, China-appointed Attesting Officer and Arbitrator of South China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission.

3. What prompted you to move into politics?

We have personal views to different policies affecting our lives, be it housing, education, environmental protection or political reform. I have always heard people talking about different policies in cafés or bars, but such casual talk does not bring about change within the society. Politics is the way to convert our aspirations into policies and make our lives better.

4. How will you use your legal training/experience as a member of LegCo? 

One of the main tasks of LegCo members is to pass bills in the Legislative Council. There is no doubt that my legal training and experience will help me read the bills and find any loopholes.

5. What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

My policy focus will be on education and housing problems, as these issues are closely related to almost every resident in Hong Kong. Such problems, if not fixed, will substantially hinder the social and economic development of Hong Kong. Meanwhile, more importantly, I intend to play an active role in reducing the confrontation between the divided camps in the Legislative Council.

6. Do you plan to devote all of your time to LegCo work or do you intend to maintain your practice at the same time?  If you plan to maintain your practice, how do you plan to strike a balance between practice and LegCo work?

I love my legal practice. As a practicing solicitor, I plan to maintain my practice during my LegCo term. However, I plan to delegate the management and administration work to my partner and my current files to my team members.

7. What one piece of advice would you give to someone thinking of pursuing a career in law?

It is an honour to become a member of the legal profession in Hong Kong. As a lawyer, you should treat it as a career instead of a job.

8. What is your motto in life?

“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift of God, which is why we call it the present.”  - from Bil Keane


Jimmy Ng (Industrial (Second) Functional Constituency)

1. What motivated you to pursue a career in law?

I believe the truth can be revealed gradually through debates. The law is the most important cornerstone of the maintenance of social order. Administration of justice is also based on the law. That is what interested me about the law since I was young. It is also the reason I decided to pursue a legal career.

2. Can you tell me about your experience as a practitioner?

When dealing with different cases, I have to work with clients from different sectors and businesses. So paying attention to updates and developments in different industries helps me to better understand clients’ needs.

3. What prompted you to move into politics?

My first experience working in the political sphere was in 1996 when I helped the former Supreme Court Chief Justice Yang Ti Liang run for the first term of the Chief Executive election.

In 2010, I joined the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association of Hong Kong (“CMA”), where I served as Chairman of the Political and Economic Affairs Committee of CMA for six years. In this position, I interacted regularly with representatives from different political parties to better understand the views of different stakeholders in the community.

4. How will you use your legal training/experience as a member of LegCo? 

As a lawyer, I researched and studied ordinances and cases, established good lines of communication with different parties, including clients, and had to prepare and study to effectively complete my work. My undertakings as a lawyer are very similar to the work of LegCo members.

In the LegCo, members have to study policies. Before speaking in meetings or questioning government officials, members also need to prepare by reading documents and media reports and drafting their speeches. Their speeches need to be strong and persuasive in order to convince and monitor the Government’s policy execution. They also need to be informative and drafted in a way that the general public can understand.

5. What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

As a representative of the industrial sector, I am very concerned about its development in Hong Kong. Hong Kong is not without an industrial sector. Its production lines are simply located outside Hong Kong. Industrial companies still choose to have their headquarters and back offices in Hong Kong. They pay taxes in Hong Kong. Therefore, I hope that the government will re-formulate a long-term “industrial policy” to provide more support to the development of the industrial sector, and invest more resources to nurture young talents for the sector.

Upgrade and restructure of the industrial sector require innovation design and advanced technology. I have high hopes for the Innovation and Technology Bureau set up last year. I hope that the Bureau will launch more initiatives and invest more resources, in terms of capital, technology and talents, to help universities transform research output into technology that can be adopted by the industrial sector.

6. Do you plan to devote all of your time to LegCo work or do you intend to maintain your practice at the same time?  If you plan to maintain your practice, how do you plan to strike a balance between practice and LegCo work?

I will maintain my practice during my term in the LegCo, but I will give top priority to LegCo work. I hope that I will be able to act as a bridge between the sector and the government, reflect to the government views of the industrial sector and promote communication between the two sides.

I have worked with the CMA for more than 13 years, and served as its Vice President for three terms. During this time, I have been engaged in the CMA’s work, while also serving in various Government advisory bodies, such as being the Chairman of the Hong Kong-Taiwan Business Co-operation Committee and a member of the Small and Medium Enterprises Committee. Meanwhile, I run a business in the Mainland, constantly engage in exchanging views with other industrial and business leaders and maintain my legal practice. With the experience and training I have gained throughout the years, I am confident that I will be able to perform well at the same time in different positions – as a LegCo member and a lawyer.

7. What one piece of advice would you give to someone thinking of pursuing a career in law?

Lawyers are professionals. Legal practice is a very serious matter. I hope young people who want to the join the legal profession act seriously and rationally, in order to maintain the professional image of lawyers.

8. What is your motto in life?

Never give up. Never stop improving yourself.

Jurisdictions: 

Editor, Hong Kong Lawyer
Legal Media Group
Thomson Reuters
cynthia.claytor@thomsonreuters.com